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Picture of the day archives

2004: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2005: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2006: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2007: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2008: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2009: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2010: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2011: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2012: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2013: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2014: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2015: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2016: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2017: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2018: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2019: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2020: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2021: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2022: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2023: January February March April May June July August September October November December

These featured pictures, as scheduled below, appeared as the picture of the day (POTD) on the English Wikipedia's Main Page in the last 30 days.

You can add an automatically updating POTD template to your user page using {{Pic of the day}} (version with blurb) or {{POTD}} (version without blurb). For instructions on how to make custom POTD layouts, see Wikipedia:Picture of the day.Purge server cache


August 17

Omega Nebula

The Omega Nebula is an H II region, a type of emission nebula, in the constellation Sagittarius. It was discovered by Jean-Philippe Loys de Cheseaux in 1745. Charles Messier catalogued it in 1764 as number 17 in his set of comet-like astronomical objects. The nebula is by some of the richest starfields of the Milky Way, in the northern two-thirds of Sagittarius. This astrophotograph of the Omega Nebula was taken by the VLT Survey Telescope (VST), located at the European Southern Observatory's Paranal Observatory in Chile. Captured by OmegaCAM, the VST's wide-field camera, in 2011, the photograph was the telescope's first image to be released.

Photograph credit: ESO/INAF-VST/OmegaCAM


August 16

Double-barred finch

The double-barred finch (Stizoptera bichenovii) is a species of estrildid finch found in dry savanna, tropical (lowland) dry grassland, and shrubland habitats in northern and eastern Australia. It is sometimes referred to as Bicheno's finch or the owl finch, the latter owing to the dark ring of feathers around the face. This double-barred finch perching on a branch was photographed in Glen Davis, New South Wales.

Photograph credit: John Harrison


August 15

Bengal tiger

The Bengal tiger is a population of the tiger subspecies Panthera tigris tigris found in the Indian subcontinent. Ranking among the largest wild cats alive today, it is considered to be one of the world's charismatic megafauna. The tiger is estimated to have been present in the Indian subcontinent since the Late Pleistocene, for about 12,000 to 16,500 years. Today it is threatened by poaching, and habitat loss and fragmentation, and was estimated to comprise fewer than 2,500 wild individuals by 2011. The tiger is the national animal of India. This female Bengal tiger was photographed in Kanha Tiger Reserve, in the Indian state of Madhya Pradesh.

Photograph credit: Charles J. Sharp


August 14

Ortolan bunting

The ortolan bunting (Emberiza hortulana) is a species of bird in the bunting family, Emberizidae. A native of most European countries and western Asia, it reaches as far north as Scandinavia and beyond the Arctic Circle, frequenting cornfields and their neighbourhoods. It is an uncommon vagrant in spring, and particularly in autumn, to the British Isles. Seeds are the bird's natural diet, but beetles and other insects are taken when feeding their young. The ortolan is served in French cuisine, typically cooked and eaten whole. Traditionally diners cover their heads with their napkin or a towel while eating the delicacy. The species is so widely used that its French populations dropped dangerously low, leading to laws restricting its use in 1999. In September 2007, the French government announced its intent to enforce long-ignored laws protecting the bird. This ortolan bunting was photographed in the Sierra de Guara, a mountain range in Aragon, Spain.

Photograph credit: Pierre Dalous


August 13

Nell Mercer

Nell Mercer (August 13, 1893 – September 30, 1979) was an American suffragist. Born in North Landing, Virginia, she grew up in Norfolk, becoming a member of the local branch of the National Woman's Party. As a member of the Silent Sentinels, she picketed Woodrow Wilson's White House in support of women's suffrage in the United States. As a businesswoman, she purchased the Brunswick Hotel in Copley Square, Boston, and was its final owner before the property was sold to IBM. This photograph of Mercer, from the archives of the National Woman's Party, was taken in the 1910s.

Photograph credit: unknown; restored by Adam Cuerden


August 12

Heart Mountain Relocation Center

Heart Mountain Relocation Center, located in Park County, Wyoming, was one of ten concentration camps used for the internment of Japanese Americans in the United States evicted during World War II from their local communities. The first inmates arrived in Heart Mountain on August 12, 1942. This 1943 photograph depicts the Japanese-American writer and journalist Bill Hosokawa in his barracks at Heart Mountain, accompanied by his wife Alice and their son Mike, and three members of staff. Hosakawa edited the internment camp's newspaper, The Heart Mountain Sentinel.

Photograph credit: Tom Parker; restored by Adam Cuerden


August 11

White-naped honeyeater

The white-naped honeyeater (Melithreptus lunatus) is a passerine bird of the honeyeater family Meliphagidae native to eastern Australia. It dwells in dry eucalypt woodland with long periods of dryness and heat, with a diet consisting of nectar from various flowers, and it also feeds on insects. The species is classified as a least-concern species by the International Union for Conservation of Nature. This white-naped honeyeater was photographed in Glen Davis, New South Wales.

Photograph credit: John Harrison


August 10

Basilica and Convent of San Francisco

The Basilica and Convent of San Francisco, Quito, is a large Catholic basilica that stands in the middle of the historic center of Quito, the capital of Ecuador, in front of the square of the same name. The church is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site that covers the city center. This photograph is an elevated view of the richly decorated main nave of the basilica, looking towards the apse and the altar in the background.

Photograph credit: Diego Delso


August 9

Black-faced monarch

The black-faced monarch (Monarcha melanopsis) is a passerine bird in the family Monarchidae found along the eastern seaboard of Australia, and also New Guinea where most birds migrate to during the austral winter (May to August). It was originally described by Louis Jean Pierre Vieillot in 1818 from a specimen collected in New South Wales. This black-faced monarch was photographed near Brunkerville.

Photograph credit: John Harrison


August 8

Rood screen of St Cyprian's, Clarence Gate

St Cyprian's, Clarence Gate, is a parish church of the Church of England in the district of Marylebone in London. The church was consecrated in 1903, but the parish was founded in 1866. It is dedicated to Saint Cyprian, a third-century martyr and bishop of Carthage, and is located near the Clarence Gate Gardens entrance to Regent's Park, off Baker Street. The parish was formed by the efforts of the noted "slum priest" Charles Gutch, who wanted a church of his own in London. Gutch negotiated for a small portion of the parish of St Paul's Church, Knightsbridge, to be transferred to a new mission district where church attendance was in any case poor. The district was about one-tenth the area of the parish, but it was densely populated due to the overcrowded slums that at that time occupied much of it. This photograph depicts the rood screen of St Cyprian's, Clarence Gate, designed by Ninian Comper in the Gothic Revival style along with the rest of the church.

Photograph credit: David Iliff


August 7

1793 French 24-livre coin

The livre (French for 'pound') was the currency of the Kingdom of France and its predecessor state of West Francia from 781 to 1794. Several different livres existed, some concurrently. The livre referred to both units of account and coins. The last banknotes and coins of the livre were issued in Year II of the revolutionary French First Republic (1794). In 1795, the franc was introduced, and the first one-franc coin was struck in 1803. The word livre survived; until the middle of the 19th century it was indifferently used alongside the word franc, especially to express large amounts and transactions linked with property (such as real estate, property incomes, or cattle). This 24-livre coin was minted in Lille in 1793, under the First Republic, and is now part of the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution. The obverse features a depiction of a winged genius by the French sculptor Augustin Dupré.

Coin design credit: Paris Mint and Augustin Dupré; photographed by the National Numismatic Collection


August 6

Edith Roosevelt

Edith Roosevelt (August 6, 1861 – September 30, 1948) was the second wife of President Theodore Roosevelt, serving as First Lady of the United States during his presidency from 1901 to 1909, and previously as Second Lady of the United States in 1901 while her husband was Vice President. She was the first to employ a full-time, salaried social secretary as First Lady. Her tenure resulted in the creation of an official staff, and her formal dinners and ceremonial processions served to elevate the position. This photographic portrait of Roosevelt was taken by the American photographer Frances Benjamin Johnston.

Photograph credit: Frances Benjamin Johnston; restored by Adam Cuerden


August 5

Oecophylla smaragdina is a species of arboreal weaver ant found in tropical Asia and Australia. It forms colonies with multiple nests in trees, each nest being made of leaves stitched together using the silk produced by the ant larvae. The species is organized into three castes: workers, major workers, and queens. Workers are 5 to 6 millimetres (0.20 to 0.24 in) long; they look after larvae and farm scale insects for honeydew. Major workers are 8 to 10 millimetres (0.3 to 0.4 in) long, with long strong legs and large mandibles. They forage, assemble and expand the nest. Both types of workers are orange in color. Queens are typically 20 to 25 millimetres (0.8 to 1.0 in) long, and normally greenish-brown, giving the species its name smaragdina (Latin for 'emerald'). This video depicts an army of O. smaragdina worker ants carrying a dead gecko in Laos.

Video credit: Basile Morin


August 4

White-headed pigeon

The white-headed pigeon (Columba leucomela) is a species of pigeon native to the east coast of Australia, belonging to the same genus as the common pigeon. It builds a nest generally consisting of scanty twigs, usually placed high in the canopy up to 18 metres (59 ft) above the ground, and tends to lay one cream-white egg. Breeding takes place mostly from October to December. The species is often found alone, in pairs or in small flocks. They are very quiet and elusive, and their flight is swift and direct. Its call is loud and gruff, sounding like a whoo followed by a gruff inhalation like uk (repeated three times). Sometimes the call is a low oom. This male white-headed pigeon was photographed near Brunkerville in New South Wales.

Photograph credit: John Harrison


August 3

Coat of arms of the Dakota Territory

The Dakota Territory was an organized incorporated territory of the United States that existed from March 2, 1861, until November 2, 1889, when the final extent of the reduced territory was split and admitted to the Union as the states of North Dakota and South Dakota. This is the Dakota Territory's historical coat of arms, illustrated by Henry Mitchell in State Arms of the Union, published by Louis Prang in 1876. The design is based on the great seal of the territory, which was officially described as follows:

A tree in the open field, the trunk of which is surrounded by a bundle of rods, bound with three bands; on the right plow, anvil, sledge, rake and fork; on the left, bow crossed with three arrows; Indian on horseback pursuing a buffalo toward the setting sun; foliage of the tree arched by half circle of thirteen stars, surrounded by the motto: "Liberty and Union, one and inseparable, now and forever".

Illustration credit: Henry Mitchell; restored by Andrew Shiva


August 2

Louis Désiré Blanquart-Evrard

Louis Désiré Blanquart-Evrard (2 August 1802 – 28 April 1872) was a French inventor, photographer and publisher of photographs. He was a cloth merchant by trade, developing an interest in photography in the 1840s, focusing on the technical and economic issues of the mass production of photographic prints. Blanquart-Evrard captured this seated self-portrait in 1869, processed as an albumen print, a technique that he had developed himself in 1847. This photograph is in the collection of the Bibliothèque nationale de France.

Photograph credit: Louis Désiré Blanquart-Evrard; restored by Jebulon


August 1

Painted buttonquail

The painted buttonquail (Turnix varius) is a species of buttonquail, the family Turnicidae, which resemble, but are unrelated to, the quails of Phasianidae. The painted buttonquail is native to Australia. Its range extends from Queensland southwards to New South Wales, Victoria, South Australia, and Tasmania. A separate population is present in the southwestern part of Western Australia. The subspecies T. v. scintillans is endemic to the Houtman Abrolhos, a chain of islands off the west coast of Australia. This painted buttonquail was photographed in the Castlereagh Nature Reserve near Sydney, New South Wales.

Photograph credit: John Harrison


July 31

Ada Flatman

Ada Flatman (1876–1952) was a British suffragette in the United Kingdom and the United States. She was sent to Holloway Prison after taking part in the "raid" on the Houses of Parliament in 1908, led by Marion Wallace Dunlop, Ada Wright and Katherine Douglas Smith, and a second wave by Una Dugdale. The following year she was employed by the Women's Social and Political Union (WSPU) to organise their activities in Liverpool, taking over from Mary Phillips. In July 1910, Flatman was a key speaker at one of the platforms in the 10,000 women rally at Hyde Park, London. She worked with Alice Stewart Ker, but it was Flatman who was trusted by Emmeline Pethick when Liverpool requested that they be allowed to open a WSPU shop. The shop was set up for her by Patricia Woodlock and became a success, raising substantial funds for the cause. Flatman organised the publicity surrounding the release of Woodlock, who had completed a prison term in Holloway.

Photograph credit: Harris & Ewing; restored by Adam Cuerden


July 30

Emma Gillett

Emma Gillett (July 30, 1852 – January 23, 1927) was an American lawyer and women's rights activist who played a pivotal role in the advancement of legal studies for women.

Photograph credit: Edmonston, Washington, D.C.; restored by Adam Cuerden


July 29

Eastern yellow robin

The eastern yellow robin (Eopsaltria australis) is an Australasian robin found in coastal and sub-coastal eastern Australia. The extent of the species's residence is from the extreme southeast corner of South Australia through most of Victoria and the western half of New South Wales and north as far as Cooktown. Birds in tropical northern Queensland are mainly restricted to the warm heights of the Great Dividing Range. This eastern yellow robin was photographed in Yengo National Park, New South Wales.

Photograph credit: John Harrison


July 28

Silver certificates

Silver certificates are a type of representative money issued between 1878 and 1964 in the United States as part of its circulation of paper currency. They were produced in response to silver agitation by citizens who were angered by the Coinage Act of 1873, which had effectively placed the United States on a gold standard. Since 1968 they have been redeemable only in Federal Reserve Notes and are thus obsolete, but they remain legal tender at their face value and hence are still an accepted form of currency. This is a complete set of the 1899 series of large-size silver certificates, designed by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing and comprising three denominations from $1 to $5. Each banknote bears the engraved signatures of Judson Whitlocke Lyons (Register of the Treasury) and Ellis H. Roberts (Treasurer of the United States), and a portrait of a different individual or individuals, identified above.

Banknote design credit: Bureau of Engraving and Printing; scanned by Godot13


July 27

Ice speedway

Ice speedway is a form of motorcycle-speedway racing on frozen surfaces. The sport uses specialised bikes that race anticlockwise around oval tracks between 260 and 425 metres (853 and 1,394 ft) in length, with a race structure and scoring similar to that of speedway racing. This photograph depicts the German speedway racer Max Niedermaier practising in Inzell, Germany, for the finals of the 2018 Individual Ice Racing World Championship, organised by the sport's governing body, the Fédération Internationale de Motocyclisme.

Photograph credit: Walter Isack


July 26

Diamond firetail

The diamond firetail (Stagonopleura guttata) is a species of estrildid finch that is endemic to Australia. The species generally inhabits drier forests and grassy woodlands west of the Great Dividing Range, and can be distinguished by a black band on a white breast. Their flanks are black with white spots with a scarlet rump and a black tail. This diamond firetail was photographed in Glen Alice, New South Wales.

Photograph credit: John Harrison


July 25

Lion's mane jellyfish, bell expanded
Lion's mane jellyfish, bell contracted

The lion's mane jellyfish (Cyanea capillata) is one of the largest known species of jellyfish, with a range confined to the cold, boreal waters of the Arctic, northern Atlantic, and northern Pacific Oceans. These photographs depict a lion's mane jellyfish in Gullmarn, a fjord on the western coast of Sweden, with its bell alternately expanded (top) and contracted (bottom). The specimen was likely a juvenile, with a bell 10 to 12 centimetres (3.9 to 4.7 in) in diameter and tentacles 60 to 80 centimetres (24 to 31 in) in length. The largest recorded individual of the species had a bell approximately 210 centimetres (7 ft) wide and tentacles around 36.6 metres (120 ft) long.

Photograph credit: W.carter


July 24

Turgot map of Paris, general overview map

The Turgot map of Paris is a highly accurate and detailed map of the city of Paris, France, as it existed in the 1730s. It was published in 1739 as an atlas of twenty non-overlapping sectional bird's-eye-view maps, each approximately 50 cm × 80 cm (20 in × 31 in), in isometric perspective toward the southeast, as well as one simplified overview map – shown here – with a four-by-five grid indicating the general layout of the twenty sectional maps. It has been described as "the first all-comprising graphical inventory of the capital, down to the last orchard and tree, detailing every house and naming even the most modest cul-de-sac".

Map credit: Louis Bretez and Claude Lucas


July 23

Obverse and reverse of an 1828 Argentine eight-escudo coin

The Argentine real was the currency of Argentina between 1813 and 1881. From 1822, it was subdivided into ten décimos. The sol was also issued during this period and was equal to the real, while the peso was worth eight reales and the escudo was worth sixteen reales. This 1828 eight-escudo gold coin was issued by the United Provinces of the Río de la Plata, a predecessor state of modern Argentina, featuring the Sun of May on the obverse and the Argentine coat of arms and motto (En unión y libertad, 'In unity and freedom') on the reverse. The coin forms part of the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution.

Coin design credit: United Provinces of the Río de la Plata, photographed by the National Numismatic Collection


July 22

Stairs to the Chapter House in Wells Cathedral

Wells Cathedral is an Anglican cathedral in Wells, Somerset, commenced around 1175 on the site of a late-Roman mausoleum and an 8th-century abbey church. The cathedral has been described by the historian John Harvey as Europe's first truly Gothic structure, lacking the Romanesque work that survives in many other cathedrals. It is the seat of the bishop of Bath and Wells. This photograph shows the stairs leading from the north transept to the chapter house.

Photograph credit: David Iliff


July 21

Buzz Aldrin

Buzz Aldrin (born 1930) is an American former astronaut, engineer and fighter pilot. He made three spacewalks as pilot of the 1966 Gemini 12 mission, and was the pilot of the Lunar Module Eagle for Apollo 11. On July 21, 1969, he and Apollo 11 mission commander Neil Armstrong became the first two people to step onto the surface of the Moon. This official NASA portrait, taken in April 1969, depicts Aldrin in a white Apollo space suit in front of a large picture of the Moon, with his helmet resting on a pedestal.

Pictures of the day are chosen from the pool of featured pictures on the English Wikipedia. Editors may vote on featured picture candidates here.

Photograph credit: NASA; restored by Coffeeandcrumbs


July 20

Lillian Feickert

Lillian Feickert (July 20, 1877 – January 21, 1945) was an American suffragist and political organizer. She served as the president of the New Jersey Woman Suffrage Association from 1912 to 1920, and later helped organize the New Jersey League of Women Voters. Feickert went on to serve as the vice-chairman of the New Jersey Republican State Committee, and unsuccessfully ran for election to the United States Senate in 1928, the first woman from the state to do so.

Photograph credit: unknown; restored by Adam Cuerden


July 19

The Hunting of the Snark

The Hunting of the Snark is a nonsense poem by the English writer Lewis Carroll, telling the story of ten characters who cross the ocean to hunt a mysterious creature known as the Snark. The poem was published in 1876 with illustrations by Henry Holiday. This is the seventh plate from his illustrations, accompanying "Fit the Fifth: The Beaver's Lesson", in which the Butcher and the Beaver hear the song of the Jubjub bird, and this causes the Butcher to be reminded of his childhood, and begin a lengthy lesson to the Beaver:

The Beaver brought paper, portfolio, pens,
And ink in unfailing supplies:
While strange creepy creatures came out of their dens,
And watched them with wondering eyes.
 
So engrossed was the Butcher, he heeded them not,
As he wrote with a pen in each hand,
And explained all the while in a popular style
Which the Beaver could well understand.

Illustration credit: Henry Holiday; restored by Adam Cuerden


Picture of the day archives

2004: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2005: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2006: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2007: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2008: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2009: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2010: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2011: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2012: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2013: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2014: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2015: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2016: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2017: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2018: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2019: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2020: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2021: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2022: January February March April May June July August September October November December
2023: January February March April May June July August September October November December